ISIS claims Tunisian beach resort massacre

2015-06-27 09:00
(File: AP)(File: AP)

Tunis – The Islamic State group on Saturday claimed responsibility for a massacre in a Tunisian seaside resort that killed nearly 40 people in the worst attack in the country’s recent history.

The jihadists said the gunman, who they identified as Abu Yahya al-Qayrawani, was a “solider of the caliphate” who had targeted enemies of ISIS and “dens… of vice” in Port el Kantaoui.

Most of those killed were “subjects of states that make up the crusader alliance fighting the state of the caliphate”, the group said in a statement released on Twitter.

The attack targeted “dens [of…] fornication, vice and apostasy in the city of Sousse” and was carried out “despite [security] measures strengthened around these dens on Kantaoui beach”, it added. Continue reading

Terror attacks around the world underline influence of Islamic State

Reuters
Islamists struck in three different attacks, but there is no evidence they were coordinated.

The attacks came one after the other in the space of a few hours.   In France, a decapitated body covered in Arabic writing was found after an attacker rammed his car into a gas container, triggering an explosion. In Kuwait, a suicide bomber blew himself up in a packed Shi’ite mosque during Friday prayers, killing more than two dozen. And in Tunisia, at least 37 people died when a gunman opened fire at a popular tourist hotel.

There is no evidence the three attacks were deliberately coordinated. But coming so close together on the same day on three different continents, they underscored the far-reaching and fast-growing influence of Islamist group Islamic State, western politicians said. Continue reading

Tunisian president reiterates support for Libya

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World Bulletin / News Desk
Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki has reiterated support for the Libyan government, shortly after the denial of a military coup attempt in the Arab country.

In a phone call with Speaker of Libya‘s General National Congress (interim parliament) Nouri Abusahmain, Marzouki said that Tunisia stands by Libya in its democratic transition.
“Security in both Libya and Tunisia is inse parable,” Marzouki was quoted as saying by the official Libyan news agency.

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Women and Islam: A Debate with Human Rights Watch

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

An Egyptian woman looking on during a rally to mark the one year anniversary of the revolution, Tahrir Square, January 25, 2012

To Kenneth Roth:

In your Introduction to Human Rights Watch’s World Report 2012, “Time to Abandon the Autocrats and Embrace Rights,” you urge support for the newly elected governments that have brought the Muslim Brotherhood to power in Tunisia and Egypt. In your desire to “constructively engage” with the new governments, you ask states to stop supporting autocrats. But you are not a state; you are the head of an international human rights organization whose role is to report on human rights violations, an honorable and necessary task which your essay largely neglects.

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Yemen: Phony Revolution Versus Real Terrorism

World map about terrorist attacks of al-Qaeda.

Image via Wikipedia

February 8, 2011
Despite pledges from oil-rich neighbors to invest, nearly as much money is moved out of the country as is moving in. Experts see Yemen as more unstable and hospitable to new investments. The core problem is, and long has, been the tribal divisions. National unity has always been weak, and often imaginary. Continue reading