Azerbaijan to transfer Iranian prisoners to Iran soon

Baku, March 19, IRNA – Based on coordination between Iranian embassy in Azerbaijan and the Azeri government, a number of Iranian nationals imprisoned in Azerbaijani jails will be transferred to Iran soon, said an official with Iranˈs embassy in Baku on Wednesday.

Mohsen Molaee told IRNA that he had visited prison number 11 of Azerbaijan Republic today and met with Iranian prisoners.Heavy costs of traveling to Azerbaijan for the prisonersˈ families who want to visit them and also heavy costs of living for the prisoners themselves were their major concerns, Molaee said.

The prisonersˈ main demand was to serve the rest of their prison sentences in Iran, Molaee added.He said he had distributed some food and cash among Iranian prisoners during his visit. Continue reading

Hundreds killed in fire at prison in Honduras

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Firemen enter the National Prison of Comayagua where a fire broke out at the facility in Comayagua. (Orlando Sierra / Getty Images / February 15, 2012)

By FREDDY CUEVAS

Associated Press

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — Trapped inmates screamed from their cells as a fire swept through a Honduran prison, killing at least 300 inmates, authorities said Wednesday.

Lucy Marder, chief of forensic medicine for the prosecutor’s office, said early Wednesday some 356 people on the prison roster are unaccounted for among 852 prisoners.

“The majority could be dead, though others could have suffered burns, escaped or survived,” she said.

The fire broke out Tuesday night at a prison in Comayagua, a town 90 miles (140 kilometers) north of the Central American country’s capital, Tegucigalpa.

Continue reading

Guantánamo policy risks long-term harm to US, former CIA official writes

By Alan Wirzbicki 

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President Obama’s decision to go ahead with

 

military tribunals at Guantánamo and authorize indefinite detention of prisoners represents a final retreat from his campaign promise to close the controversial facility Continue reading

Al-Qaida prisoners living in hostels after early release

Jamie Doward, home affairs editor
The Observer, Sunday 19 July 2009

At least 20 men suspected of harbouring al-Qaida sympathies and convicted of terrorism offences have been released from British prisons this year, according to probation staff.

The men had reached the two-thirds point of their sentence and therefore qualified for release back into the community, where the majority are being supervised by probation staff as they reside in hostels.

Many have been placed on curfews or placed under strict licence conditions in a bid to ensure they are kept under close supervision. But the revelation that convicted terrorists are being housed in hostels is likely to trigger a national debate on how best the authorities can deal with what is considered by many experts to be a new type of serious offender.

Most of the men released so far were convicted for offences associated with the possession of terrorist material or literature or aiding others who went on to carry out terrorist attacks both in the UK and abroad. The probation union, Napo, claims that nine men convicted for terrorist offences are being housed in hostels in London, two in the Midlands and another four in Yorkshire.

Probation staff say that, although many of those released may pose a real threat, the normal tools used to assess the risk of reoffending are of limited value because of the motivation which led to their crime.

“It is extremely difficult to work with any individual whose criminal behaviour is politically motivated,” said Harry Fletcher, assistant general secretary of Napo. “The psychology is totally different from the vast majority of persons convicted of criminal offences whose activity is either acquisitive or, in cases of violence, often pathological.”

However, with an estimated 160 people convicted of terrorism offences inspired by al-Qaida currently residing in Britain’s jails, there is growing pressure on the authorities to give details of how they intend to deal with convicted terrorists.

While most are considered “minor” offenders, several convicted of more serious offences are due to be released soon. Andrew Rowe was given a seven-and-a-half year sentence after being caught with details of how to fire mortar bombs and secret codes to facilitate terror attacks. He is due to appear before the parole board within weeks.

Raids on his home uncovered a handwritten guide to firing battlefield weapons, videos of the 9/11 atrocities and tapes of Osama bin Laden. He had used the names of specific models of mobile phones as code for words and phrases such as “airline crew”, “explosives” and “army base”. His socks carried traces of TNT and plastic explosives.

A Ministry of Justice spokeswoman said anyone convicted of terrorist offences and sentenced to more than 12 months’ imprisonment would be subject to probation supervision on release from prison.

“They have to adhere to a set of strict conditions and are subject to recall to custody if they breach their conditions or their behaviour indicates that it is no longer safe to allow them to remain in the community,” she said. The Home Office has also pledged to deport any convicted terrorists who are foreign nationals.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009/jul/19/al-qaida-prisoners-hostels

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