Iran’s assets in Canada include more than $2.6-million held in 13 different bank accounts, Ottawa reveals

Stewart Bell | 13/09/09 | Last Updated: 13/09/10 1:36 AM ET
More from Stewart Bell | @StewartBellNP

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Wayne Cuddington / Ottawa CitizenThe Embassy of Iran on Metcalfe St. in Ottawa after Foreign Minister John Baird announced, diplomatic relations between Canada and Iran have been suspended.

Iran’s assets in Canada

Non-Diplomatic Assets

Iranian Cultural Centre, 2 Robinson Ave., Ottawa

Parking spot, 36A-570 Laurier Ave., W, Ottawa

RBC account 8649493, Higher Education Advisory

Scotia Bank account 40006-04451-18, Higher Education Advisory, $1.9-million

RBC account 00006-1029586, $203,000

RBC account 8649589, €333,000

RBC account 108-99-45

RBC account 108-99-52

RBC account 864-95-89

RBC account 864-95-74

Scotia Bank account 04654-10

Scotia Bank account GIC 17465324

Scotia Bank Visa account

CIBC Trust account 48 06816

CIBC Trust account 48 06719

BMO account 1051 017

Supreme Court of B.C., File S071189 $325,000 (This is a judgment awarded to the Iranian shipping lines. The money is frozen under UN sanctions)

Diplomatic Assets

Embassy of Iran, 245 Metcalfe St., Ottawa

Official residence, 524 Acadia Ave., Ottawa

Staff quarters, 1202-570 Laurier Ave. W, Ottawa

RBC account 00006-1089978

Scotia Bank account 400060030112

The federal government has identified millions of dollars worth of Iranian state assets in Canada, ranging from bank accounts to a parking spot, that may now be claimed by victims of terrorist groups sponsored by the Islamic republic.

The list of Iran’s 22 Canadian assets was to be released by the Department of Foreign Affairs on Tuesday to help victims who want to collect damages from Iran due to the regime’s support for terrorist groups such as Hezbollah and Hamas.

A copy of the list obtained in advance by the National Post includes the Iranian Cultural Centre in Ottawa, a parking spot in the capital, 13 bank accounts containing more than $2.6-million, a VISA account and $325,000 currently frozen under United Nations sanctions. Continue reading

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