Nasrallah: We Will Target Tel Aviv and Other Areas in Israel With Thousands of Rockets

Iranian regime President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Syrian dictator Assad and Hezbollah terror leader Hassan Nasrallah met for dinner in 2011 in Damascus. Hassan Nasrallah (far right) has made few public appearances since 2006. This dinner was held shortly after US Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs William Burns met with Assad in Damascus.

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Hezbollah terror group leader Hassan Nasrallah told supporters the “Lebanese resistance” will target Tel Aviv and other areas in Israel with thousands of missiles if attacked.

Fars News reported:

Secretary-General of the Lebanese Hezbollah Movement Seyed Hassan Nasrallah said the Lebanese resistance will target Tel Aviv and other areas in Israel with thousands of missiles in case of a possible Israeli aggression against Lebanon.

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Pardoned Moroccan clerics say they were tortured

Thursday – 2/9/2012, 12:12pm  ET

 Muslim cleric Hassan al-Kettani speaks at a press conference in Rabat, Morocco Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012. Three conservative sheikhs, recently pardoned by the king after nine years in prison, complained of torture and called for the release of all prisoners of conscience. (AP Photo/Paul Schemm)

By PAUL SCHEMM
Associated Press

RABAT, Morocco (AP) – Three conservative clerics whose arrests nine years ago heralded the beginning of Morocco’s crackdown on Islamists called on Thursday for a new investigation into their country’s worst terrorist attack.

After the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks in the U.S., Moroccan authorities began targeting hardline Islamist clerics, especially those believed to be sympathetic to al-Qaida _ a crackdown that broadened after the May 2003 bombings in Casablanca that killed 45.

The three clerics were convicted and sentenced to up to 30 years in prison at the start of 2003 _ before the Casablanca attacks. Their pardoning by the king and release from prison over the weekend on the Prophet Muhammad‘s birthday suggests the government may finally be relaxing a fierce campaign against Islamists characterized by mass arrests.

In a news conference, the clerics said a new probe is needed to find out who was behind the bombings. The results of official investigations were never publicized though several people were convicted for carrying it out. Continue reading

Targeted killings and two worlds in Afghanistan: inside the Takhar attack

On September 2, 2010, ten men in northern Afghanistan were killed in an air attack that was a targeted killing, part of the U.S. Special Forces ‘kill or capture’ strategy. The U.S. military said it had killed the Taliban deputy shadow governor of Takhar, who was also a ‘senior member’ of the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan (IMU): one Muhammad Amin, as well as “eight or nine other insurgents.”

Many Afghans, including senior government officials, were incredulous. Many knew the man who had actually been targeted — who was not Muhammad Amin, but Zabet Amanullah. He had not fought for the Taliban since 2001 and had been out campaigning for his nephew in Afghanistan’s parliamentary elections with more than a dozen other men, mainly extended family members. That very morning, as per usual, he had called in to the district police chief to check on security before the election campaign convoy set off. The strike was an “obvious mistake,” said the provincial governor, Abdul-Jabar Taqwa. “He was an ordinary person and lived among normal people,” said the Takhar Chief of Police, Shah Jahaan Nuri. “I could have captured him with one phone call.” Continue reading