Was the Malaysian Plane Hacked? Probably Not

2672775_ml featureThe mysterious vanishing of the Malaysian flight raised a startling amount of rumors and theories of all kinds. While most are at least somewhat feasible, the recent cyber attack theory is closer to science fiction

By Maty Kishinevsky and Natalie Novitski

Over the last few days a new thoery concerning the disappearance of the Malaysian flight popped up: Hostile elements managed to take over a cellular phone on the plane, using it to connect to the plane’s avionics and bring the aircraft down. This feat is almost impossible even when the target is a ground vehicle, and when the target is airborne things get even more complicated.The plane itself uses radio to communicate with ground stations, but mobile devices use other means of communications. “There’s a way to control a phone remotely, but the device has to be connected to a network – cellular or internet.” This according to Avi Rosen, CEO and co-founder of cellular security developer Kaymera. “If you’re outside cellular reception range, or if you don’t have a stable internet connection on the plane, there’s no way to infiltrate the phone and remotely control it.” Continue reading

INTERPOL has Warned for Years that Terrorists Could Use Stolen Travel Documents

By: Anthony Kimery  03/14/2014 ( 1:28pm)

Interpol

Interpol (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In May 2007, INTERPOL Secretary General Ronald K. Noble warned the Senate Committee on the Judiciary’s Subcommittee on Terrorism, Technology and Homeland Security that countries which do not provide their border control officers at airports and other points of entry with direct access to INTERPOL’s database on Stolen and Lost Travel Documents (SLTD) are leaving their citizens exposed to grave danger.Noble told US lawmakers that terrorists’ use of stolen travel documents represents a gaping hole in global security.

The INTERPOL chief — a former Department of Treasury Under Secretary for Enforcement – said “The decision therefore by [then] Department of Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff to give Customs and Border Protection [CBP] officers access to INTERPOL’s database by the end of 2007 is one which should be welcomed as a significant step forward in enhancing border security.”“Clearly,” Noble told the committee, “the next step is for all border officers at all airports and other points of entry in all countries around the world to be given access to INTERPOL’s SLTD database, and for the support network to be put in place to ensure that any country registering a hit can immediately receive any necessary follow-up information.” Continue reading