Israeli Army dismantles spy device on border with Lebanon

January 21, 2014 12:34 AM By Mohammed Zaatari

The Daily Star

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UNIFIL soldiers stand guard as Israeli soldiers foot patrol the border area with Lebanon as seen from Adaisseh, Monday, Jan. 20, 2014. (The Daily Star/Mohammed Zaatari)

ADAISSEH, Lebanon: Calm was restored to the border Monday following a tense standoff between the Lebanese and Israeli armies, as the latter removed an apparent spy device from a disputed area. An Israeli technical specialist unit, accompanied by some 40 soldiers, entered the disputed border territory near the southern village of Adaisseh at around 11 a.m. Monday to dismantle a device found under an olive tree the day before.

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Nasrallah: We Will Target Tel Aviv and Other Areas in Israel With Thousands of Rockets

Iranian regime President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, Syrian dictator Assad and Hezbollah terror leader Hassan Nasrallah met for dinner in 2011 in Damascus. Hassan Nasrallah (far right) has made few public appearances since 2006. This dinner was held shortly after US Undersecretary of State for Political Affairs William Burns met with Assad in Damascus.

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Hezbollah terror group leader Hassan Nasrallah told supporters the “Lebanese resistance” will target Tel Aviv and other areas in Israel with thousands of missiles if attacked.

Fars News reported:

Secretary-General of the Lebanese Hezbollah Movement Seyed Hassan Nasrallah said the Lebanese resistance will target Tel Aviv and other areas in Israel with thousands of missiles in case of a possible Israeli aggression against Lebanon.

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Resignations Deepen Crisis for Lebanon

January 12, 2011

Resignations Deepen Crisis for Lebanon

By NADA BAKRI

Joseph Eid/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images

A poster in Beirut of Hezbollah’s leader, Hassan Nasrallah, right; Michel Aoun, center; and Nabih Berri, the Parliament speaker.

BEIRUT, Lebanon — Hezbollah and its political allies withdrew from Lebanon’s cabinet on Wednesday, toppling a national unity government that had brought a measure of calm to the troubled Middle Eastern country since 2009 and deepening an emerging crisis over a United Nations-backed tribunal investigating the assassination of a former prime minister.

In practical terms, however, the turmoil will have little effect, as the government has been paralyzed for months.

The resignations returned Lebanon to familiar terrain. Hezbollah and its foes have wrestled over the direction of the country since the former prime minister, Rafik Hariri, was killed in a bombing along the Beirut seafront in February 2005.

After a lengthy investigation, the tribunal is now expected to indict members of Hezbollah, a Shiite movement that the United States considers a terrorist organization and the single most powerful force in Lebanon. Continue reading

Lebanese coalition collapses in turmoil over probe

Lebanese coalition collapses in turmoil over probe

Move sparks fear of civil war

A covered statue of slain Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri stands in Beirut. Eleven of 30 Lebanese Cabinet members, all supporters of Hezbollah, resigned Wednesday, sinking the coalition government after months of disagreement over how to respond to a U.N. probe into the assassination. (Associated Press)

By Shaun Waterman

The Washington Times

8:36 p.m., Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Lebanon‘s year-old coalition government collapsed Wednesday amid fears that a United Nations report into the 2005 assassination of the country’s prime minister will trigger a new civil war and plunge the Middle East into another conflict.

“We may well be seeing the opening moves of the next Middle East war,” said Bruce Riedel, a veteran U.S. national security official who is now a Middle East scholar at the Brookings Institution.

The government in Beirut fell after 11 of 30 Cabinet ministers, all supporters of the Hezbollah-backed March 8 bloc, resigned – the culmination of a long tussle with other elements of the coalition over how to respond to a U.N. special tribunal investigating the killing. Hezbollah, a Shiite extremist group backed by Iran and Syria that the United States has designated a terrorist organization, is a legal political party with a large parliamentary caucus in Lebanon. Following inconclusive elections in 2009 and months of haggling, Hezbollah and its allies joined a unity government in Beirut. Continue reading

The World in Denial about Hizballah

BEYOND THE DROPZONE

Posted by W. Thomas Smith Jr. on 3 May 2009 at 5:07 pm UTC

In a May 2 article (published in the New York Post and elsewhere), Kenneth Bandler, communications director for the American Jewish Committee, writes, “The case of ‘Hizballah’s man in New York’ offers a compelling glimpse into the expansive world of 21st-century terrorism, where democratic free-speech rights are exploited by terror groups as part of their war against the West.”

Hizballah’s “man in New York,” as Bandler is referring to, is convicted terrorist-enabler Javed Iqbal, who is presently serving a six year prison sentence after having pled “guilty to aiding terrorists through his activity in America” in December 2008. Continue reading