Top Pakistani militant Ilyas Kashmiri reported killed in US drone attack

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Pakistani television in Karachi reports the death of top militant leader Ilyas Kashmiri in a US drone strike in the tribal territory of South Waziristan. Kashmiri is believed to be behind some of the deadliest attacks in India and Pakistan.-Newscom

Ilyas Kashmiri was a senior Al Qaeda operative believed to be behind some of the deadliest attacks, including a suicide attack on Pakistan’s spy agency and attacks on US forces in Afghanistan.

By Brad KnickerbockerStaff writer / June 4, 2011

Ilyas Kashmiri, a top Pakistani militant and senior Al Qaeda operative, reportedly has been killed in a US drone strike in the tribal territory of South Waziristan, according to press reports and a statement from the group he headed.

Kashmiri is believed to be behind some of the deadliest attacks in India and Pakistan, including a 2009 suicide attack on Pakistan’s spy agency and attacks on US forces in Afghanistan. Continue reading

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ISI Provided Me Training in Lahore: Headley

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AP Photo/ Tom Gianni

In this courtroom sketch, David Coleman Headley is shown in federal court, in Chicago.

ISI Provided Me Training in Lahore: Headley

PTI | Lalit K Jha/Himani Kumar/Chicago | May 26, 2011

Dissatisfied with the military and espionage training received by Mumbai attacks accused David Headley from the Lashkar-e-Taiba, Pakistan‘s spy agency ISI provided him a special discourse in Lahore for carrying out surveillance ahead of the 26/11 carnage.

“ISI did provide me (espionage) training,” Headley told a Chicago court as he was grilled by the defence attorney Charles D Swift on the third day of the trial today of Pakistani-Canadian Tahawwur Rana, another co-accused in the 26/11 attacks.

The training by the Pakistan intelligence agency to Headley was provided by Major Iqbal, who was his ISI handler, on the streets and in a two-storey safe house in Lahore near the airport, the 50-year-old Mumbai terror accused told jury during the course of questioning by Swift.

Headley told the court that when he met Major Iqbal in 2006, he expressed dissatisfaction at the military and espionage training that he had received from the LeT earlier.

Major Iqbal, who was identified by Headley as ‘Chaudhery Khan’, told him that the training received from LeT was “not very good” and was “very elementary”, so he decided to give instructions to him.

It was a two-storey house in a residential neighbourhood and there was a small compound outside the house, Headley said when pressed by Swift during the closing hours on the third day of the trial. Continue reading

Defense attorneys set to cross examine governments star witness in 2008 Mumbai terror case

Image by VINUhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/vinu...

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The testimony from Headley, who was born in the U.S. but spent much of his life in Pakistan, comes at a tense time for U.S.-Pakistan relations, on the heels of the May 2 killing of Osama bin Laden outside Islamabad that raised concerns Pakistan may have been hiding the world’s most wanted terrorist. Continue reading

Pakistan’s military implicated by held terrorist

El Fagr's 17 October 2005 headline page.

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Captive names high-ranking major as co-conspirator in planned attack on Jyllands-Posten A high-ranking officer in Pakistan‘s intelligence agency, ISI, was involved in the planning of a large-scale terrorist attack on Jyllands-Posten newspaper, according to Pakistani-American terrorist David Headley. Headley has…

A high-ranking officer in Pakistan’s intelligence agency, ISI, was involved in the planning of a large-scale terrorist attack on Jyllands-Posten newspaper, according to Pakistani-American terrorist David Headley.

Headley has been imprisoned in Chicago after confessing to helping plan the 2008 terrorist attacks in Mumbai and other terror attacks that did not go ahead, including one against Jyllands-Posten newspaper in Copenhagen as revenge for publishing the Mohammed cartoons in 2005. Continue reading

Does the CIA Need a Country’s Permission to Spy on It?

No, but sometimes it helps.

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Pakistan‘s military is demanding that the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) sharply cut back its activities in the country in the wake of undercover agent Raymond Davis’s arrest on murder charges and subsequent release. In addition to scaling back the number of CIA drone strikes on Pakistani targets, Pakistani Army chief Gen. Ashfaq Parvez Kayani has insisted on the withdrawal of all contractors working for the CIA and all operatives like Davis, who are working in “unilateral” assignments, meaning that only one country (read: not Pakistan) is aware of their presence. But since when does the CIA need a country’s permission to conduct intelligence operations? Isn’t the whole point that the local government isn’t supposed to know they’re there? Continue reading

Pakistani militants fighting one jihad for many reasons

Tom Hussain, Foreign Correspondent

Last Updated: January 29. 2010 12:18AM UAE / January 28. 2010 8:18PM GMT

Religious schools are one of the means – but far from the only one – by which jihadists are recruited. Khalid Tanveer / AP Photo

LAHORE // A year ago, in the central industrial city of Gujranwala, a gentle, thoughtful giant of a man named Asim Goraya agreed to arrange meetings for The National with local representatives of Lashkar-i-Taiba, the militant group accused of carrying out the November 2008 terrorist attacks on Mumbai.

However, Goraya had little in common with LiT. Rather than spend his days plotting the destruction of India and the United States, he believed in a romanticised jihad that was a duty for practising Muslims and involved fighting only the non-Muslim powers occupying Muslim lands.

That sense of duty led him to run away in 1980 from home at the age of 12 to join the jihad against the Soviet forces then occupying Afghanistan; he got as far as a training camp in the north-west Khyber tribal agency before his father tracked him down four days later and took him home. Continue reading