Libya detains ICC investigators

Sunday, June 10, 2012

clip_image001The International Criminal Court in the Hague says four of its staffers have been detained in Libya, where they are part of an official mission to meet with Saif al-Islam Gadhafi, the imprisoned son of deposed dictator Moammar Gadhafi.

Court President Sang-Hyun Song requested their immediate release and urged Tripoli to ensure their safety.  His statement issued Saturday said “these four international civil servants have immunity when on an official ICC mission.”

The four, including Australian lawyer Melinda Taylor, were detained Thursday as they were trying to meet with Saif al-Islam Gadhafi in Zintan, southwest of Tripoli, where he has been held by revolutionary fighters since his capture in November.  The delegation has been assigned by the court to discuss his defense arrangements.

Sources in Libya say Taylor was trying to pass documents to Saif during the visit. They said police also found a camera and a recording device on another female member of the delegation during a search after the visit.

Libya’s representative to the ICC, Ahmed al-Jahani, said Taylor was “not in prison but under house arrest in Zintan” where she was being questioned.

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Gadhafi’s son captured: reports

Ronald D. Orol

Saif al-Islam Gadhafi sits in an airplane in Zintan, LIbya, on Saturday after being captured in the southern desert and flown to the northern city.

WASHINGTON (MarketWatch) – Moammar Gadhafi’s son has been captured in the desert by fighters who plan to hold him until there is a Libyan administration to which they can hand him over, according to media reports Saturday.

Gadhafi’s son, Saif al-Islam Gadhafi, 39, had been accused of crimes against humanity.

Saif al-Islam was captured near the southern desert city of Obari and flown to the fighters’ base in Zintan, in northern Libya, the BBC reported.

It was unclear Saturday whether al-Islam will face trial in Libya or whether he will be transferred to the International Criminal Court in the Hague, Netherlands, for a trial there for his alleged involvement in the killings of civilian protesters.

Prior to the uprising in Libya, al-Islam appeared set to take over from his father to rule the country. His father, who ruled Libya for almost 42 years, was captured and killed by rebels on Oct. 20. Another son, Mutassim, was killed the same day and a third son, Khamis, was killed earlier in the civil war.

Al-Islam had been in hiding since the National Transitional Council, the current government of Libya, had pushed his father from Libya’s capital Tripoli in August.

Protests in Egypt

Thousands take part in Friday prayers in Cairo’s Tahrir Square as they demand an end to military rule and a new constitution in Egypt. Video and image: Reuters

The council was established by anti-Gadhafi forces during the civil war in Libya. It seeks to set up a constitutional democracy with an elected government, according to reports. Continue reading