Maritime insecurity in the Gulf of Guinea

  • Author: Gustavo Plácido dos Santos
  • Source: Intelligence unit
  • Published: 19 March 2014
  • Filed: 19 March 2014

Fighters with the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND), pictured in 2008 (Photo: Pius Utomi Ekpei)

Summary

  1. Maritime insecurity incorporates a range of criminal activities, including piracy, smuggling and illegal fishing.
  2. The Gulf of Guinea has recently surpassed the more infamous Gulf of Aden as the epicentre of maritime insecurity.
  3. It is likely that the United States will increase its naval presence in the Gulf of Guinea during 2014.
  4. It is likely that the EU will also participate in an international intervention in the region, though this could possibly be stalled.
  5. It is likely that the international community will push West African countries to legislate for the deployment of armed security guards on their vessels and agree to greater inter-state collaboration.
  6. The potential conflict of interests between the international community and shipping companies over armed guards and/or external intervention will likely force a consensus approach that will possibly fail to address the root of the problem.
  7. It is highly likely that the above moves will lead to a temporary increase in violence in the region.
  8. As such, maritime insecurity in the region is likely to increase throughout 2014, and Benin, Togo and Guinea-Bissau, in particular, are likely to witness an increase in criminal activities across their territorial waters.

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Eurocops want to build remote car-stopper, shared sensor network

English: Petards ANPR camera on mobile ANPR us...

English: Petards ANPR camera on mobile ANPR use – Police Car (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

EU-wide ‘open source intelligence’ and video-sharing also on the agenda

By Simon Sharwood, 31st January 2014

Civil liberties monitoring group Statewatch has uncovered a document sent from the General Secretariat of the European Council to the Standing Committee on operational cooperation on internal security that suggests European law enforcement agencies develop technology that would allow them to stop any car using wireless networks.

The document (PDF) outlines a “work programme” for a “European Network of Law Enforcement Technology Services (ENLETS) 2014 – 2020”. ENLETS launched in 2008 and is tasked with collaboration and technology-sharing so that european law enforcement agencies can benefit from one another’s research and technologies, and also access information when appropriate.

ENLETS’ existence is not a secret. This document revealed by Statewatch appears not to be intended for public consumption as while much of it is an anodyne explanation of how ENLETS will create information-sharing processes dubbed “ENLETS disseminates Best Practice (EDBP)”, the five aims of EDBP raise eyebrows

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Parallels of History: "the end of war is nigh"

Monday, November 26, 2012

clip_image002While Syria slaughters its own people and Cairo burns yet again, idealism reveals again, that war is to be left in the dustbins of history.  Similar predictions were made in 1909, just 4 years before the first World War, and in the 1930’s by Neville Chamberlain, on the eve of the Second World War.  In the 90’s, Clinton slashed our military with the idealism that the world would be a safer place.  It ignored the rising attacks by Islamist Terrorists and declarations of war by al-Qaeda, in hopes it would just go away.  It claimed terrorism was a law enforcement problem, and should be tried in court, rather than prosecuted by militaries.

Zero Ponsdorf of This Ain’t Hell points out the latest prediction of the impending future world of peace.  And some blame the realism of Veterans, of the fact that Sovereign Nations maintain standing Armies for self-defense, that wars continue.  Evidently, some believe that if Nations will just give up the means to defend themselves, then dictatorships will stop trying to take over their land and people.

Meanwhile, in the real world, the Communist Central Party of China has selected their new set of leaders, without ANY input from their Chinese subjects and are publishing new passports with maps of claiming the territory of several Pacific Nations, from the Philipines, to India, to Korea, to Japan, and of course Taiwan.

clip_image004Communist China has been using the profits of the lead coated toys it sells to our kids, to buy modern battleships, aircraft carriers, and troop transports.  It has taken over from the Soviets in stealing our technology, for such things as the Stealth Fighter which the Obama Administration decided was unneeded for our own military.  It has doubled its military spending in the last decade, and continues to increase it by double digits.  And now, it is making claims on the islands of the Pacifics in a manner reminiscent of 1930’s Japan.  The one thing that has contained China’s military threat for decades is being erased: its inability to project the power of its 4.5 Million man Military.

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Iran suspends oil exports to France, UK

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Iran exports 2.2 million barrels of oil a day, 18% of which is bound for European markets, according to the EIA.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Other customers will “replace French and British companies,” an Iranian oil ministry spokesman says
  • The EU sanctions are meant to force Iran to provide more information on its nuclear program
  • Iran exports 2.2. million barrels of oil daily, 18% of which is bound for European markets

Tehran (CNN) — Iran’s oil ministry announced Sunday that it had stopped crude exports to British and French companies.

The order came several days after Iran threatened to cut oil exports to some European Union countries in retaliation for sanctions put in place by the EU and the United States in January, a ministry spokesman said in a statement.

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EU Official Warns Bosnia May Lose Funds Over Political Tensions

 

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Nebojsa Radmanovic, one of the three members of Bosnia‘s ethnically based presidency (file photo)

September 15, 2011

A European Union official has warned that Bosnia may lose 96 million euros in EU pre-accession funds because of political bickering by its rival regions.
Andy McGuffie, the EU spokesman in Bosnia, said the tensions have endangered Instrument for Pre-Accession Assistance (IPA) funds for Bosnia for 2011, the European Commission‘s help to regional governments meant to harmonize their legislation with EU standards.

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Security Council: Somalia risks losing support

UN Security Council Chamber in New York.

Image via Wikipedia

NAIROBI, Kenya – The U.N. Security Council is warning Somali leaders that they risk losing financial support if they can’t agree on how to carry out upcoming elections.

Somalia‘s government depends on international support for almost everything, including the salaries of soldiers and lawmakers. Around 9,000 African Union troops are stationed in Mogadishu to prevent the government from being overrun by militants. Continue reading

North Kosovo: Dual Sovereignty in Practice

Map of municipalities of Kosovo

Image via Wikipedia

Europe Report N°211 14 Mar 2011

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The dispute between Kosovo and Serbia is most acute in Kosovo’s northern municipalities. The North has not been under effective control from Pristina for two decades; its sparse and predominantly rural Serb population uniformly rejects integration into Kosovo. Though small and largely peaceful, it is the main obstacle to reconciliation and both countries’ European Union (EU) aspirations. A Kosovo-Serbia dialogue mediated by the EU began on 8-9 March 2011 and is likely over the coming months to look at some of the consequences of the dispute for regional cooperation, communications, freedom of movement and the rule of law. For now, however, Belgrade, Pristina and Brussels have decided that tackling the North’s governance or status is too difficult before more efforts are made to secure cooperation on improving the region’s socio-economic development, security and public order. Continue reading