Eurocops want to build remote car-stopper, shared sensor network

English: Petards ANPR camera on mobile ANPR us...

English: Petards ANPR camera on mobile ANPR use – Police Car (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

EU-wide ‘open source intelligence’ and video-sharing also on the agenda

By Simon Sharwood, 31st January 2014

Civil liberties monitoring group Statewatch has uncovered a document sent from the General Secretariat of the European Council to the Standing Committee on operational cooperation on internal security that suggests European law enforcement agencies develop technology that would allow them to stop any car using wireless networks.

The document (PDF) outlines a “work programme” for a “European Network of Law Enforcement Technology Services (ENLETS) 2014 – 2020”. ENLETS launched in 2008 and is tasked with collaboration and technology-sharing so that european law enforcement agencies can benefit from one another’s research and technologies, and also access information when appropriate.

ENLETS’ existence is not a secret. This document revealed by Statewatch appears not to be intended for public consumption as while much of it is an anodyne explanation of how ENLETS will create information-sharing processes dubbed “ENLETS disseminates Best Practice (EDBP)”, the five aims of EDBP raise eyebrows

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Watching the Watchers, 2013 Style

 

January 31st, 2013

img31187We’ve never really been adept at dealing with insider threats. Some organizations have internal detection and monitoring programs, usually aligned with anti-fraud efforts, and some also include more robust forensics programs to look for evidence after-the-fact, but we still have a problem with insiders. With the proliferation of virtualization and cloud computing, we have more trouble than ever. There are two trends I see that explain this.

First, let’s talk virtual environments. A number of things tend to happen in virtual infrastructure that can lead to poor privileged user management and monitoring practices. First, many shops hand virtualization over to an existing admin group, like say…the Windows team. Not a great move, for a lot of reasons. This team still has to manage their existing systems and infrastructure, like Active Directory, DNS, and other platforms and applications. This means they’re part-time virtualization admins, at least for a while. A lot of folks think virtualization is easy, and it is…to a point. But virt technologies can suffer from neglect just like any other systems and apps can, and missing patches and failing to implement configuration controls can have a devastating effect.

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Afghanistan Signs Strategic Partnership with Eutelsat to Accelerate Access to Satellite Infrastructure for Digital Services

English: Eutelsat's satellite fleet on the geo...

English: Eutelsat’s satellite fleet on the geostationary arc (2008) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

 

“Fast track to Digital Afghanistan” says ICT Minister, His Excellency Amirzai Sangin

Regulatory News :

Eutelsat Communications (Paris:ETL) (NYSE Euronext Paris: ETL), one of the world’s leading satellite operators, and the Afghanistan Ministry of Communications & Information Technology (MCIT) today announced they have signed an MOU giving Afghanistan satellite resources that will enhance deployment of its national broadcasting and telecommunications infrastructure as well as its international connectivity.

Under the multi-year agreement, Eutelsat will deploy an in-orbit satellite from February 2014 to 48deg East to deliver full national coverage and extensive reach of Central Asia and the Middle East. The satellite will be officially called AFGHANSAT 1 by the Government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, reflecting Afghanistan’s entry into the commercial satellite business.

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Murphy’s Law: 21st Century War, How It Will Be Different And Why

Marine Corps RQ-7B Shadow unmanned aerial vehi...

Marine Corps RQ-7B Shadow unmanned aerial vehicle launches from Speedbag Airfield (Photo credit: Official U.S. Navy Imagery)

January 24, 2014: The wars in Afghanistan and Iraq were different in a lot of ways many people didn’t expect, understand, or even notice. For example, the three week conquest of Iraq was not facilitated so much by high tech weapons, but largely by Cold War era gear using World War II tactics. The most crucial weapons were the decades old M-1 tank and M-2 infantry vehicle, with the 1960s vintage M-109 self-propelled artillery provided most of the artillery support. The 1950s era B-52 bomber was still the most cost effective way to deliver bomb attacks.

And what was so unique about conquering Iraq in three weeks while outnumbered? The British did this in 1941, using only two divisions under similar circumstances (and with far fewer armored vehicles). Not only that, the 1941 Iraqis also had the support of Germany, France and Russia. Made no difference.  Afghanistan featured a handful of American Special Forces troops calling in air strikes while deep in enemy territory. That was standard practice during the 1960s Vietnam War. But change is in the air, it’s just a bit more complex a wave of change than most pundits are trying to describe.

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Israeli Army dismantles spy device on border with Lebanon

January 21, 2014 12:34 AM By Mohammed Zaatari

The Daily Star

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UNIFIL soldiers stand guard as Israeli soldiers foot patrol the border area with Lebanon as seen from Adaisseh, Monday, Jan. 20, 2014. (The Daily Star/Mohammed Zaatari)

ADAISSEH, Lebanon: Calm was restored to the border Monday following a tense standoff between the Lebanese and Israeli armies, as the latter removed an apparent spy device from a disputed area. An Israeli technical specialist unit, accompanied by some 40 soldiers, entered the disputed border territory near the southern village of Adaisseh at around 11 a.m. Monday to dismantle a device found under an olive tree the day before.

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Kazakhstan & Germany strengthen cooperation in Space sector

21 January 2014, 19:40

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ASTANA. January 21. KAZINFORM – Today at the National Space Agency (NSA) the Head of Kazkosmos Talgat Musabayev has met with Joachim Klein, the Head of IABG mbH German company representative office in Kazakhstan.

IABG mbH company is one of the leading companies in Germany in the space industry and it has one of the largest testing centers for spacecraft, aircraft and vehicles. The company was established in 1961 by the Federal Republic of Germany as a central organization for testing in aerospace industry as well as analysing defense and security systems.

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Google And The Somali Pirates

System Overview from US Coast Guard

System Overview from US Coast Guard (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

June 17, 2012: An official from Google recently announced at a defense technology conference that his firm would soon roll out a feature that would allow any Internet user to track all ships at sea, including U.S. Navy warships, in real time. The Google official was angry that the navy itself did not have this capability. This shocked many in the audience and later embarrassed the Google official. Turns out that the navy has had this tracking capability since the 1980s, when it began equipping its ships with AIS (Automatic Identification System) transmitters that all large ships are required to carry in order to qualify for insurance.

For more than a decade satellites have been used to more rapidly collect and distribute the AIS transmissions, making it easier for these large ships to be tracked. Shipping companies are the main users of this information. The U.S. Navy has used the AIS monitoring system since the 1980s.

The navy, however, can turn off certain AIS information as needed. For example, the warships can only transmit location but not name of the ship. This tells mariners and others (like Google users and Somali pirates) with access to AIS information that a large ship is at a certain location. The U.S. Navy sometimes has its ships turn off AIS altogether. Naturally, smaller, uninsured ships do not carry AIS and are more likely to be carrying illegal cargo. Smugglers with AIS can turn it off, although that can also raises suspicions if someone notes that AIS signal being turned off. The U.S. Navy will not discuss its capabilities to use AIS for deception.

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